Why is Ruth from the Bible Important to the Aboriginal Moabite Nation?

Discussion of Ruth, Moabitess

The Moabites and the Israelites have a kinship according to the Book of Genesis and the Book of Ruth in the Bible. Ruth, the Moabitess, was the great-grandmother of King David and the great, great-grandmother of the wealthy King Solomon, in the ancestral lineage of the Messiah. Her ancestral roots trace back to Ancient Egypt (Kemet) up to biblical times, with a connection to Terah, the father of Abraham and Haran, who was Abraham's brother and the father of Lot. After the destruction of the Kingdoms of Sodom and Gomorrah, the remaining families of Abraham and his nephew Lot fled to the Land of Canaan, and sojourned there together before they parted ways. Later, Lot and his daughters left and ended up in an area east of the Jordan.


During these times of Patriarchal era, it was important to have sons to carry on the family name in order to claim the land where they dwelled. Well, Lot had no sons, and according to the Bible story, there were no men for his daughters to marry, so his daughters, out of desparation, came up with a plan to have sons with their father in order to continue the lineage of Lot. They each became pregnant with sons, and his eldest daughter gave birth to Moab, while his younger daughter gave birth to Ben-Ammi. Hence, the sons laid claim to the Land of Ammon named after Lot's younger son, and the Land of Moab, a mountainous strip of land named after Lot's eldest son. This is where Ruth and her sister Orpah were born, and why Ruth is referred to as a Moabitess.


Supposedly, the Moabites opposed the Israelite invasion of Canaan, and were excluded from their Congregation of relatives for ten generations. However, Creator had a different plan and blended the families again when Elimelech (of the Clan of Ephrath from the Tribe of Judah), his wife Naomi, and their sons Mahlon and Chilion journeyed to the Land of Moab and settled there because of famine in the Land of Judah (ie. "the land flowing with milk and honey"), due to their disobedience toward Creator. According to the law which resulted from the earlier opposition, Moabite men were not allowed to intermarry with Israelite women. However, the Israelite men were allowed to marry Moabite women.


Hence, their two sons took wives ... Ruth and Orpah (third generation descendants) ... and lived happily in Moab for roughly ten years, until Naomi's husband died, and later her sons died too. This left Naomi, Ruth, and Orpah ... as well as many other Moabite women, ... in a Matriarchal society, governed by women, as most of the men had died in war. As the story goes, Naomi had grieved the loss of her husband and sons, and decided to return to her own land in Judah, where she heard the famine had been lifted and crops were abundant. Her daughters-in-law followed her, but Naomi later advised Ruth and her sister Orpah to return to Moab to take care of their own mother. Orpah chooses to go, but Naomi could not convince Ruth that it was best for her to return. Ruth chooses, in faith, to stay with her mother-in-law, and this is where the infamous statements, "Where you go I'll go. Where you stay I'll stay. Your people will be my people. Your God will be my God." originate. Some conclude that this means Ruth “changed her religion.” However, this statement is irrelevant; it should be noted that even when one changes their religion, their Nationality NEVER changes. Therefore, Ruth was still a Moabitess.


Anyway, you can read the rest of the story in Ruth 1-4 of the Bible. Naomi hooks Ruth up with a relative of her husband's, Boaz. He offers to continue the ancestral lineage of Elimelech, Naomi's husband, by marrying Ruth and allowing their first born son to carry the name of Naomi's husband. Naomi now had a close relative who would restore her life and care for her in her old age. They named the son Obed, who would become the father of Jesse, who was the father of King David.


Ruth had worked diligently in the fields that Boaz owned, and Boaz made sure there was always enough of the harvest left for widows, orphans, and those less fortunate. Boaz favored Ruth because of her honor for her mother-in-law, an older widow than she was. She was not selfish, but cared for her much greater than a house full of sons. This is the intent of the International Aboriginal Moabite Nation ... to honor and take care of those who are unable to care for themselves ... to make sure our Nation's people are in the utmost health ... to have a greater impact in our Affiliate's lives than some people's relatives, and even their own governments. Will you join us in our efforts??? We look forward to your helping us to build a unique Nation that is loving, caring, and understanding ... like Mother G'yia (Mother Earth) would adore!